A List of All the Things That Normal People Can Just Do But Are Now Behaviors Because I’m Autistic

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When I was younger, I was quirky. I didn’t have a diagnosis then, and nobody noticed the myriad of small ways that I managed my sensory world, or if they did they just thought “yeah, she’s a kid, she’s particular and picky.” But then I became and adult and those quirks didn’t go away. I continued to do kiddish things because they felt nice on a sensory level.

And then I got a diagnosis of autism, and I knew that if that had been around for all of my childhood, those quirks wouldn’t have been quirks. They would have been behaviors. There would have been an explicit program introduced into my life to extinguish them. When I was “normal” they were fine, but now that I’m autistic they are signs of my difference, and when you’re disabled every sign of difference needs to disappear. That’s how you survive in the world right? Never stick out, never appear incapable, never ask for help.

This all came into sharp focus for me last month when I was talking to a parent, and as a way of explaining one of their child’s struggles they said “the moment he comes home he always wants to put on his pajamas. I think it must be a sensory thing. What do I do?” I had to look her straight in the face and say “I do that. Don’t do anything.” She looked shocked. I can fake neurotypical decently enough. When I wasn’t diagnosed, no one ever imagined that this was something I should have to change, because I was an adult and I could do whatever weird stuff I wanted to. But here was this mom, convinced that because it was a symptom of autism it was a problem and she needed advice about how to manage it.

My advice? Let it be unless it’s hurting someone. So without further ado, here are all the things that would have been seen as problem behaviors to be extinguished if I were diagnosed as a child.

-Wearing a onesie on a regular basis, sometimes in public
-Chewing on things, all the things, including jewelry that I have specifically bought to chew on
-Having very specific dietary requirements that limit what I will eat (I will never eat fish, have a gag reflex every time I come near tofu, prefer to eat chicken nuggets as often as possible, and typically don’t cook beyond “press the button on the microwave”)
-Eating food that’s undercooked, specifically grains and sometimes raw pasta
-Stimming! I twist back and forth to crack my ankles when I’m standing, or sometimes roll onto the sides of my feet to stretch my legs out. I chew on my lips semi constantly, and when I was a kid I chewed on my hair.
-I will not talk on the phone unless it’s an emergency. I don’t care if it’s considered rude, I have such major anxiety.
-I grind my teeth, pinch myself, or dig my fingers into my arms when I’m upset.
-I lose verbal ability when I’m deeply upset and sometimes will use text instead.
-I periodically will sleep for 15+ hours at a time.
-I use my phone when socializing to manage anxiety (this was just seen as super rude for a long time, but no one told me they were going to use therapy to make me stop).
-I don’t sit upright in chairs unless I’m at work. No seriously, I slide down into them and turn into a weird little ball.
-I become obsessively interested in things and will engage in them for hours and hours to the point of almost hating them (video games, or a particular movie or TV series). Netflix binges aren’t seen as a symptom for most people.
-I wore two watches as a kid. No reason, I just liked it.

A lot of these are things that I KNOW neurotypical people do. But you add enough of them together and suddenly all of them are problems, because now you’re autistic and you can’t do anything that might be weird, or that might be because of sensory sensitivities/executive dysfunction/social issues. Why are autistics held to a higher standard than NTs? I might hazard a guess of ableism, but what do I know? I’m an autistic who still has all these negative behaviors.